horroroftruant

horroroftruant:

The Art of Jeff Preston

With clients ranging from Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, The United Methodist Publishing House, Miller/Coors, Dark Horse Comics and Cintas the uniform company, his almost three decades of work has been as diverse as his clientele. “A true illustrator should be able to illustrate anything, it’s our job! To take something we might not know anything about and present a final product that will make the viewer assume that we are experts on the subject”.  When asked to sum up the past 30 years he just says, “it’s a nice start”. 

Jeff Preston treats each assignment as if it were his last. “As I’m working I ask myself if it were all to end now is this the illustration I would want to be my legacy?”  Perhaps somewhat melodramatic but he truly believes in the approach and it seems to be working. More than technique and professional polish the one word that best sums up his illustration is “passion”!  That’s something that can not be put on with a brush or rendered in with a pencil. It’s the one thing that connects with the viewer, the heart that goes into the illustration. It’s there or it isn’t, there’s no middle ground.  ”If I can evoke  an emotion when the audience sees my work I have succeeded. Whether it’s a smile, a hearty laugh, a tear or even reaching in their wallet to buy the product my illustration  promoted… I’ve made my touchdown”.

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horroroftruant:

Behind The Scenes Photos from Classic Universal Monster Movies

Spearheaded by producer Carl Laemmle, Jr. and visionary makeup artist Jack Pierce, Universal Studios’ series of monster movies were responsible for giving the world of cinema its first true horror icons, laying the groundwork for all other iconic boogeymen to follow. 

Beginning in 1925 with the Lon Cheney fronted silent horror classic The Phantom of the Opera, Universal Studios churned out a series of monster movies that were heavy in tension, suspense and atmosphere, setting the ominous mood and tone for each film by way of thick fog, classical music scores and towering gothic castles. Adapting the works of such prominent literary figures as Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker and H. G. Wells, Universal effectively established itself as Hollywood’s ‘House of Horrors’ and continued its landmark series through the 1960s, the last of its original iconic monsters arriving in 1954 with Creature From the Black Lagoon.